‘Charging Bull’ sculptor says ‘Fearless Girl’ distorts his art. He’s fighting back. – The Washington Post

The project is about “girl power,” she said, a message to corporate boards on Wall Street with a dearth of women members “that we are here, that we are heard, that we are permanent.”

They also drew inspiration from Di Modica’s surprise installment, albeit with a permit, and dropped her off in the middle of the night. The girl quickly became an online sensation, earning praise from Chelsea Clinton and actress Jessica Chastain and drawing its own swarm of women and girls who felt inspired.

The plaque at the feet of “Fearless Girl” reads: “Know the power of women in leadership. SHE makes a difference.”

This overt reference to State Street’s SHE Index could contribute to Di Modica insistence that “Fearless Girl” is nothing more than marketing trickery orchestrated by the firm’s New York advertising partner, McCann.

“That is not a symbol!” the 76-year-old Sicilian immigrant told the New York Post and Market Watch in March.

New York City’s relationship with its bread and butter industry is really quite fascinating. It’s analogous in some ways to mining towns’ relationship with the mining industries that often don’t treat them well.

Of course, Wall Street does actually treat New York reasonably well, all things considered. Certainly better than Anaconda ever treated Montana, or Shell treats Louisiana. And in both places, when the chips are down, they know who butters their bread.

It was a really fascinating thing after Deepwater Horizon, when folks everywhere seemed to be saying that we must halt offshore drilling. Everywhere except Louisiana, which had paid the heftiest price for the disaster. To this day they have not forgiven BP. But still, drill baby drill.

They need it. The joy of being as relatively privileged as New York City is that they don’t. They can be wealthy and sanctimoniously resentful of its source.


Category: Newsroom

About the Author

Will Truman (trumwill) is a southern transplant in the mountain east with an IT background who bides his time taking care of their daughter while his wife brings home the bacon. You will probably be relieved to know that he does not generally refer to himself in the third-person except when he's writing short bios on his web page.

3 Responses to Love/Hate

  1. I wonder how that tracks with university towns? I suppose it depend son the town. I’ve observed two up close, but because I was a mostly clueless students, I’m not sure how good my observations are and I’m not sure how they scale at any rate.

    Have you read Hochschield’s STRANGERS IN THEIR OWN LAND? I got about 2/3 of the way through. The part the oil industry plays is interesting and seems to mostly reflect the dynamics you talk about. However, she seems to overplay it, expressing a little too much (for my taste) bewilderment at the “great paradox” of Louisianans being hurt by the oil industry and yet not voting for Democrats. Still, it’s probably worth a read.

  2. Steve Downey says:

    It was originally renegade art. Probably inside strings already pulled, but the artist dropped it at the Wall St. Christmas tree in the middle of the night with a plan to avoid the cops. And the city was working to get rid of it.

    http://chargingbull.com/chargingbull.html

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