SantaFamilyJoel Kotkin writes about The Battle of the Upstarts, the Bay Areas of Texas (Houston) and California (San Francisco), and their very different models for recent success.

Do Americans have romantic standards that are too high? Ty Tashiro advocates “moneyballing” romance, giving yourself not lower standards, but better ones. Agree or disagree, I think he makes remarkable points about how we are influenced in mate-selection by our culture, and in counter-productive ways.

Slate has a collection of population-balanced maps of the United States. It’s interesting, though senate or no, and even though having less imbalance than we do now might be advantageous, having truly balanced state populations don’t really make a whole lot of sense and even if we were re-drawing the map (which I do for fun and fame!) it shouldn’t be the primary criterion.

ArsTechnica tests a $35 Firefox OS phone. It’s functional, but crikey I think Americans are throwing away better phones than this every day.

We’re fracking more than ever, and while methane emissions on public lands are up, they’re actually down, industry-wide.

Men and women approach marital happiness and divorce differently. Whereas women look for positive experience, men look for a lack of negative experiences. This actually plays in to certain stereotypes.

The biggest thing holding back Google Fiber, apparently, is television and our reluctance to actually cut the cord. Will HBO’s and CBS’s decision to offer Internet-only subscriptions change that?

JD Tucille asks if the end of extended unemployment benefits played a role in the return of jobs.

Where have all the good men gone? Maybe women shouldn’t insist on the “steady job” thing?

A new smartphone may be on the horizon, high-quality and cheaper than its rivals. Farhad Manjoo wonders how they’re going to make a profit. I actually think that getting the carriers to sign off may be the bigger problem. (Also, not only is “One” already taken, namewise, but it’s not a good name to begin with. What’s up with that?)

Julian Sanchez explains why the planet of Krypton doesn’t really make sense, when you think about it from an evolutionary standpoint.

Vox argues that feminism is the key to Japan’s demographic woes.


Category: Newsroom

About the Author

Will Truman (trumwill) is a southern transplant in the mountain east with an IT background who bides his time taking care of their daughter while his wife brings home the bacon. You will probably be relieved to know that he does not generally refer to himself in the third-person except when he's writing short bios on his web page.

6 Responses to Linkluster Citibike Stations

  1. The biggest thing holding back Google Fiber, apparently, is television and our reluctance to actually cut the cord. Will HBO’s and CBS’s decision to offer Internet-only subscriptions change that?

    As others have noted, sports are probably the lock that keeps people tied to their cable operator. Yes, some leagues now have online access like the NBA and MLB, but local teams are still blocked out along with nationally broadcasted games on TNT and ESPN.

    As an interesting note, I’m probably one of the few people that doesn’t bother with a triple play. I’m a DirectTV, Vonage, and Verizon FiOS customer. Yes, it’s a bit more expensive, but I prefer the setup because the cable company has traditionally had terrible boxes and poor channel selection, and FiOS isn’t a price competitive when the fees are taken into account along with the pricing for the higher tiers.

    • trumwill says:

      Is the Triple Play even popular anymore, with people cutting their landlines? I’ve never done it myself, used to be because I didn’t have cable/sat, now because I don’t have a landline (we have Ooma, but we don’t even plug it in. But apparently bundling, even if not triple-play, is still a thing, according to the article.

      Yeah, sports is one of the big things keeping cable afloat.

      • we have Ooma, but we don’t even plug it in.

        I was considering switching since my mom prefers having a landline, and I prefer having something that isn’t dependent on the so-so cell service (for all providers) around here.

        But apparently bundling, even if not triple-play, is still a thing, according to the article.

        Some providers will offer the double play with just television and cable service with a slight discount over the triple play, and my local operator even offers a package with internet and telephone for the few people who don’t watch television.

        • trumwill says:

          Yeah, come to think of it I don’t have much pain to want any of the two. No need for phone, prefer cable to DSL (though have no choice here) and prefer satellite to cable.

  2. I actually think that getting the carriers to sign off may be the bigger problem.

    Out of the box, it works for T-Mobile and AT&T and the respective first and third party prepaid networks that rely on those networks, so it’s not the end of the world. OTOH, because Americans are trained to buy from the carriers or from big box stores that have arrangements with them, I question if this approach will work.

    FWIW, if I was an Android user on T-Mobile or AT&T, I’d definitely consider this phone. 🙂

    • trumwill says:

      Yeah, it’ll work on the two less evil carriers and their networks. I just don’t know if, without the endorsement of the carriers, it’s financially viable.

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